How to Make Your Own Tea Blends

Tea is a delicious, satisfying drink that also has many great health benefits. But, getting some at a store or restaurant can get a little expensive. By making tea blends in your own home, you not only save money, but you can choose ingredients specifically for the effects and benefits you desire! Here’s our easy […]

Tea is a delicious, satisfying drink that also has many great health benefits. But, getting some at a store or restaurant can get a little expensive. By making tea blends in your own home, you not only save money, but you can choose ingredients specifically for the effects and benefits you desire!

Here’s our easy guide on how to make great DIY brews:

1. Get an Infuser

tea infuserImage Courtesy of flickr.com

Many great, reusable infusers are available on the market these days. You can get anything from a standard mesh ball to cute manatees! However, you don’t even need to purchase a nice infuser. You can buy disposable tea filter bags in bulk sets. Infuser tea pots are a quality reusable option, too. You will be putting your loose leaves and/or secondary ingredients in the infuser to steep in hot water, so make sure you buy a size proportionate to the amount you want to make each instance. 

2. Choose Your Base

tea

Your base is going to be the bulk of your blend. As a general rule of thumb, you should have a three to one ratio of base to other ingredients. However, it is always an option to make a purely herbal blend without a standard base. But, if you want a tea, here are the properties of the main types to help you choose.

Black Tea

black tea

This is the standard base. Black tea has strong caffeine and will thus give you an energy boost. But, it also has antioxidants, vitamins, minerals and is both antiviral and anti-inflammatory.

Green Tea

green tea

Green tea is incorporated into many weight loss regimens because it increases metabolism and can block the absorption of bad fats.

White Tea

white tea

This base offers skin protection, strengthens your immune system and can even reduce the build up of dental plaque.

Oolong Tea

oolong tea

Oolong falls between black and green tea, but carries the benefits of both. This is perfect for people who want a moderate energy boost with some of green tea’s positive effects.

3. Select Your Secondary Ingredients

One of the best parts of making your own blend is that you get to spice up your base with whatever secondary ingredients you want! This gives you control over both the flavor of your tea and the health benefits you receive. Here’s a list of some of the most popular ingredients to add with some of their positive effects.

Chamomile

Chamomile tea provides good rest, and can also treat digestive problems like constipation.

Eucalyptus

eucalyptus tea

The koalas were right on this one; eucalyptus has many benefits, including easing coughs and congestion.

Ginger

ginger tea

This flavorful ingredient can help circulation, ease nausea, relieve stomach aches and those unfortunate hangovers, and even has antiviral properties.

Ginseng

Ginseng brings a sweet and earthy flavor to your blend. Health wise, it can help you relax and reduces fatigue.

Lavender

lavender tea

Other than adding a floral flavor to your mix, this ingredient is soothing, calming and leads to good sleep.

Lemon Peel

Dropping some cut lemon peels into your blend adds great vitamin C and can even reduce your risk of skin cancer!

Mate

mate tea

Mate can add additional caffeine to your tea as well as reducing allergy symptoms. It also has detoxifying qualities.

Peppermint

This ingredient obviously brings cool flavor into your tea blend, but it also aids in digestion, reduces nausea and can ease the pain from headaches.

Rose

Rose brings a light, flowery flavor to your tea, helps the circulatory system and can soothe the nerves.

Sage

sage tea

Add this ingredient for a piney taste in your tea, or if you desire sore throat relief.

Cinnamon

This sweet ingredient is perfect for enhancing the flavor of your blend, and has powerful invigorating properties.

Hibiscus

hibiscus tea

Many people use hibiscus as a substitute for a base if they don’t want to use actual tea leaves. This ingredient adds tart, berry, and floral flavors. Hibiscus can help your bowels and urinary tract function.

4. Steep Your Tea

Use the following guide to determine how long you should steep your tea. In general, the bolder you want your tea, the longer you should steep. However, steep too long, and it will get a bitter taste.

steep time tea

Image Courtesy of steepedtea.com

5. Pour and Enjoy!

 

You’re ready to go! Wasn’t that easy? Just pour into a cup, hot or over ice, then sip your healthy, delicious concoction.

Coffee person instead? Try these health tips to make your morning pick-me-up better for you!

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